Archive for the 'Positive & Productive Meetings' Category


Current Project: PPM Cards

Wednesday, April 8th, 2009

I have been immersed in my current project and haven’t had much time for updates. I am designing a set of cards to be used with Positive and Productive Meetings. In addition to the layout, I’ve done the lion’s share of the writing and the various illustrations. This cards details a technique called Timed Talk that can be effective at moving groups through a difficult issue. I like the detail of the color coded clock times, indicating whose turn it is to speak.

 


The Daily Icon: Draft PPM Process

Friday, March 13th, 2009

Here’s a rough draft of a graphic for the Positive and Productive Meeting process. The previous iteration was very cartoony and hasn’t aged well. Drawing the original was my first experience with Adobe Illustrator. Before that I created all my graphics in Fireworks. I didn’t know any better.

 

Moving Targets

Wednesday, December 6th, 2006

The staff at the Mediation Center here in Asheville use a ‘Moving Targets’ graphic template to facilitate a discussion about the role of mediators and trainers in their organization. The walls weren’t suitable for hanging paper and writing, so we used the table top. After everyone had had a chance to jot down their ideas, we reviewed the comments together and discussed why things ended up where they did.

 

Co-op graphics

Tuesday, October 17th, 2006

The final graphic from the co-op board meeting posted inside the store.

 

PPM Training in Macon

Monday, October 16th, 2006


Last week Amanda George and I did another day of Postive and Productive Meetings training, this time just outside of Macon, Georgia. Eighty people involved in Georgia’s Good2Great project attended the daylong session.

We used this poster as a way to help people focus on the various parts of the process. We colored each of the four main points as we began our discussions on the topic and referred people back to the questions as a way to frame the day.

 


This poster captured the group’s feedback about what was working and not working in their current meeting practices. My favorite picture is the little man who is ‘sticking to the agenda’ under the ‘working’ heading.

 

PPM in Atlanta

Saturday, October 7th, 2006

Last week I ventured down to Atlanta to train a group of human service organizations on Positive and Productive Meetings. Here are a handful of the action-graphics created during the course. There’s a full posting on the day at the PPM site.

 

Graphic Facilitation: Board Meeting

Thursday, September 21st, 2006

Last night I facilitated a meeting with the board of the Haywood Road Market in West Asheville. This was a follow-up to our May meeting, the first time this particular board had gotten together as a collective. Back then there was great excitement for the work ahead and some trepidation about roles and responsibilities. Since then the board has made great strides with their various initiatives. Nowadays, some of the excitement has been drained away by the rigors of committee work and a huge time commitment to the food co-op.

We approached the meeting with a very general agenda. The roles issue from May’s meeting was on the docket, but proved to be a non-issue. The check-in went much longer than I intended, but it really seemed to be what the board needed. It gave them a chance to step back and look at their work. They were all pleasantly surprised to see how far they had come in such a short time. It is easy to lose sight of the good you’re doing when you’re too busy doing good.

I tried to focus on using more graphics and less text in the recording of this meeting. Facilitating and recording together can be challenging, though I think it encourages the facilitator to listen more and talk less. The end result, seen above right, gave the board members something concrete to look at and share, to show their work. The graphic is much more compelling than any bulleted list.

We used the graphics from the May meeting to get us back up to speed. It was amazing how much of the previous conversation came back to all of us as we looked over my old doodles.

 

PPM Templates

Tuesday, September 19th, 2006

I am in the midst of developing a series of graphic templates for Positive and Productive Meetings. This is the first one to be piloted, a framework that uses icons to guide people through a PPM style agenda. I used it to help chair a company wide meeting for the Unturned Stone. The meeting was held in Pilot Mountain State Park where the trail crew works. There weren’t any walls to hang paper from, but it wasn’t too windy. The agenda guided us through the meeting and provided a gentle rustling sound in the background.

 

PPM Course Book II: The Process Revised

Tuesday, May 16th, 2006

In a previous entry from August 2005, I presented the first graphic version of the Positive and Productive Meetings process. This was built for a short, introductory paper about PPM. As we were developing the course book, I decided to redo the graphic entirely. The course book includes a running sample of a small team working to change their meetings. The new version of the process includes the characters from the team and better matches the bolder, iconic style of the PPM organizing principles.

 
 

The PPM Course Book

Thursday, May 11th, 2006

I recently received my finished copies of the Positive and Productive Meetings course book. Developed in collaboration with Helen Sanderson and Amanda George, the book is the culmination of several months of work. The creative process was made more demanding in that all three of us were never in the same place once during the entire time. We eventually developed a good, e-mail based workflow that supported our competing demands and geographic distance. I would ship the latest draft just before I went to bed and catch Helen just as she woke up on the other side of the Atlantic.

I did the design and layout and particularly like the bold colors of the cover. The icons represent the four organizing principles of PPM: Purpose, People, Process and Progress.